Criminology

WJEC Level 3 Applied Diploma

An understanding of criminology is relevant to many job roles within the criminal justice sector, social and probation work and sociology and psychology.

WJEC Level 3 Applied Diploma in Criminology is a qualification with elements of psychology, law and sociology that complements studies in humanities.

This is an Applied General qualification. This means it is designed primarily to support learners progressing to university. It has been designed to offer exciting and interesting experiences that focus learning for 16-19 year-old learners and adult learners through applied learning, i.e. through the acquisition of knowledge and understanding in purposeful contexts linked to the criminal justice system. The qualification would support learners’ progression from any study at Level 2, particularly GCSEs in Sociology, Law, Psychology, Citizenship, History and Humanities.

There are no formal entry requirements for this qualification. It is likely to be studied by 16-19 year olds in schools or colleges alongside GCE A Levels, as part of a programme of study with vocational qualifications in Law, or Welsh Baccalaureate.

Qualification structure:

Learners must complete ALL units.The first mandatory unit will enable the learner to demonstrate understanding of different types of crime, influences on perceptions of crime and why some crimes are unreported.

The second mandatory unit will allow learners to gain an understanding of why people commit crime, drawing on what they have learned in Unit 1.

The third mandatory unit will provide an understanding of the criminal justice system from the moment a crime has been identified to the verdict. Learners will develop the understanding and skills needed to examine information in order to review the justice of verdicts in criminal cases.

In the final mandatory unit, learners will apply their understanding of the awareness of criminality, criminological theories and the process of bringing an accused to court in order to evaluate the effectiveness of social control to deliver criminal justice policy.

For more information contact: Mr L Clarke